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Bau’s Wind Cave

As the name suggests, Wind cave got its name from the constant rush of wind blowing through its chambers as the cave has openings on both ends. Located in Bau, it is just mere minutes drive away along Bidi road and the signposts easily guide you there. There is a big parking area at the entrance and stalls selling food and drink, as this is one of the favourite weekend spots for city folks to come for a relaxing time with the family. Apart from the great natural beauty of the surroundings, this nature reserve also has a small beach area along the river that runs past the entrance and this is where most of the water fun activities take place.

Lambir Hills National Park

One of the famed national parks for its botanical diversity Lambir Hills National Park in Miri is a wonderful recreational area with waterfalls and pockets of hill slopes for excellent picturesque experience and naturally. With a land area of 6952 hectares, it is one of the smaller parks in Sarawak.

Fairy Cave Bau

Fairy cave in Bau is a must-see for those who love nature-cave photography as this limestone cave is just minute’s drive from the town. Word of advice here is that you have to climb some four flights of stairs to reach the entrance! The view from the top is naturally breathtaking to say the least – the surrounding countryside marked by fields of rice cultivation, crops and wild forest stretches over the horizon.

Castle of mystery

Standing atop a hill overlooking Batu Gajah, Perak, Kellie’s Castle is the most famous castle in Malaysia. It was built by Scottish planter William Kellie Smith in 1915, in honour of his wife Agnes and in celebration of their son Anthony, who was born 11 years after the birth of their first child – a daughter they named Helen. The grand estate combines Moorish, Roman and Indian architectural styles – the latter was influenced by his fascination with India and the Hindu religion. William also went as far as to import bricks and tiles from India for the construction of his castle. He even brought in 70 skilled Indian labourers from Madras to work on it.

Semenggoh Wildlife Centre

The Semenggoh Wildlife Centre was established in 1975 to care for wild animals which have either been found injured in the forest, orphaned, or were previously kept as illegal pets. It has been a resounding success, caring for endangered mammals, birds and reptiles from dozens of different species. However, it is the orang utan rehabilitation programme that has made the Centre famous. In one respect, Semenggoh has been too successful – so many orang utan have been successfully reintroduced into the surrounding forest reserve that the forest’s carrying capacity has been reached, and rehabilitation activities have been transferred to the Matang Wildlife Centre, part of Kubah National Park.

10 Ultimate Things to Do in Sarawak At Least Once in Your Life

With all of us cooped up at home, we certainly have so much time on our hands (besides #WFH) to plan how best to feed our wanderlust. This is why we came up with this list of 10 ultimate things to tick off your travel checklist when in Sarawak. And if you have never been to Sarawak before, we hope this will spark your interest to come down here because truly, there is just so much #MoreToDiscover in Sarawak.

BAU: Discover Bung Jagoi

Standing at just 1,600 feet above sea level, Bung Jagoi – a small mountain within the Jagoi area in Bau – hides in it a very old Bidayuh settlement. Located near the top of the mountain, the village was nearly altogether abandoned. Today it has become a heritage area, and Bung Jagoi is also drawing visitors who either come here to see remnants of the Bidayuh’s past or to enjoy a scenic hike minus all the obstacles that usually come with it.

BAKUN: A journey of unexpected surprises

For city folks such as I, a trip out of the urban jungle presents a much-needed opportunity to reinvigorate the mind, body and soul, and broaden one’s horizons. So when opportunity knocks, I will answer without a moment’s hesitation. That opportunity came knocking last October, when I was invited on a media familiarisation trip to Belaga, a small district in the Division of Kapit, Sarawak. Having never been there before, the trip was a journey of discovery of many things previously unknown to me. And I got to make new acquaintances, with whom I shared an exciting week-long adventure.

SARAWAK: Hiker’s playground

Hiking. Some fear even the thought of it, some are so addicted to it that they cannot go a week without finding a mountain to scale, even though it’s an easy one to climb. If you are the latter, then the summits of Sarawak are literally playgrounds for you adrenaline junkies!

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